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Take a look back at the history of the DII Festival as Pittsburgh gets ready to host the 2018 festivities.

Maintained Matthew Leffler

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Hurricane Florence ravaged the Carolinas last week with a historic amount of rainfall and damage, which left the people affected by the storm to deal with the aftermath this week and for the foreseeable future.

For them, it appears they won’t be undergoing the recovery process alone, with several area programs assisting in donating supplies and holding drives to support the victims of the storm.

Several teams are doing their outreach through hosting on-campus donation drives for clothing, water, food and other essentials.

Other programs have T-shirts for sale that have phrases imprinted such as “One Carolina” or “Carolina Strong.” According to the schools, all proceeds will go to programs such as Habitat for Humanity and other organizations assisting in hurricane relief.

Hurricane Florence canceled or postponed several football, men’s and women’s soccer and volleyball matches the past weekend. Many of the programs that had games canceled are the ones assisting in the relief efforts that are sure to be a long process.

The National Weather Service station in Raleigh announced North Carolina had a cumulative rainfall of 8 trillion gallons throughout the state.

Maintained Matthew Leffler

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Sean Delahanty Responds To WLKY Questions – Judge Sean Delahanty



























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By Site Administrator Category: In The Media

Visit WLKY’s site to see the videos…WLKY Sean Delahanty Videos

Text of Article:

Judge Sean Delahanty is a 2018 candidate for Jefferson County District Court Division 6 judge.

Your professional background:

I have been the Jefferson County District Court Judge in Division Six for twenty years. Prior to sitting on the bench I was self-employed general practitioner for 18 years, representing clients in both civil and criminal matters in both state and federal court. In addition I represented I.U.E. Local 761 and its members.

1

What role can a district court judge play to reduce jail overcrowding and which tools, if any, would you use to that end?

The Jefferson County Jail Policy Review Committee and the Kentucky bail reform committee are currently working with law enforcement, with members of the court system as well as community members to find solutions to jail overcrowding. Experienced judges are crucial to implementation of any new policies that arise from the work of these committees.

2

Do you feel like district court could work more efficiently? If so, how can you help in this process?

The biggest obstacle to efficiency is the sheer volume of cases handled in Jefferson District Court on a daily basis. The National Center for State Courts, after a study of Jefferson County courts, has suggested the addition of two new judicial divisions to handle the volume experienced here.

3

What in your legal experience makes you the best choice?

Experience prior to taking the bench and on the bench. I have tried fifty jury cases and represented clients from a wide spectrum of the community as both a plaintiff and defense attorney. I have twenty years of experience on the bench and presided as Chief Judge of District Court during the prior reorganization of the Court.

4

Any other issues:

The Opiod Epidemic contributes significantly to jail overcrowding. District Court (and now Family Court) has a docket dedicated to cases impacted by drug use. Treatment options have increased, but not at the pace of criminal drug use. The community and Commonwealth of Kentucky must continue to educate themselves in regard to the best practice for dealing with opiod use in court cases.

WLKY Article With Video Of Sean Delahanty


Maintained Matthew Leffler
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TOKYO (Reuters) – An escalating trade war between the United States and China has dampened manufacturers’ appetite for investment in equipment, causing growth in the industrial robot market to slow, the chief of the global robot industry group said.

Many global manufacturers “are now in a wait-and-see mode, wondering whether to shift production (away from China) to, let’s say, Vietnam or the United States,” said Junji Tsuda, chief of the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), in an interview on Thursday.

IFR, which brings together nearly 60 global robot suppliers and integrators, predicts worldwide industrial robot sales this year to grow 10 percent compared to last year’s 30 percent jump.

China is the world’s largest robots market with a 36 percent global share, with its sales volume exceeding the total of Europe and the Americas combined.

Tsuda, also the chairman of Japan’s Yaskawa Electric Corp, said the manufacturers would move out of the wait-and-see mode by the end of this year.

It will take a while for the direction of the trade war to be clear, Tsuda said. “But global demand for smartphones, semiconductors and autos have been solid, and the time will eventually come that they can wait no longer and will resume investment to meet the demand.”

Yaskawa, one of the world’s top robot manufacturers, last week cut its annual operating profit forecast to 59 billion yen ($524.40 million) from 65.5 billion yen, citing a slowdown in smartphone-related demand in China and growing caution over the trade dispute.

From next year onwards, however, IFR expects the robot market growth to pick up again, forecasting an average 14 percent increase per year through 2021.

($1 = 112.5100 yen)

Reporting by Makiko Yamazaki; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman

Maintained Matthew Leffler

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Media captionPresident Trump said he wanted answers on the issue

The US has asked Turkey for a recording said to provide strong evidence that Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed at Istanbul’s Saudi consulate.

“We have asked for it, if it exists,” President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House.

Mr Khashoggi has not been seen since entering the building on 2 October. Saudi Arabia denies killing him.

Meanwhile, the Washington Post has published the last column Mr Khashoggi wrote before his disappearance.

In the column he talks about the importance of a free press in the Middle East.

The newspaper’s Global Opinions editor Karen Attiah said its release had been delayed in the hope that Mr Khashoggi would return safely.

“Now I have to accept: That is not going to happen. This is the last piece of his I will edit for The Post,” she wrote. “This column perfectly captures his commitment and passion for freedom in the Arab world. A freedom he apparently gave his life for.”

What did the last column say?

Mr Khashoggi presented a strong criticism of the state of press freedoms in the Arab world: “The Arab world is facing its own version of an Iron Curtain, imposed not by external actors but through domestic forces vying for power.

“The Arab world needs a modern version of the old transnational media so citizens can be informed about global events. More important, we need to provide a platform for Arab voices.”

He mentioned the case of his fellow Saudi writer, Saleh al-Shehi, who he said “is now serving an unwarranted five-year prison sentence for supposed comments contrary to the Saudi establishment”.

“Such actions no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community,” he wrote. “Instead, these actions may trigger condemnation quickly followed by silence.”

What is Trump’s latest position?

Saudi Arabia is one of Washington’s closest allies and the Khashoggi disappearance is putting the administration in an awkward position.

Confirming that the tape said to provide evidence of the killing had been requested, Mr Trump added: “I’m not sure yet that it exists, probably does, possibly does.”

Mr Trump said he expected a report from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo who has just been to Saudi Arabia and Turkey.

The president said the truth would come out “by the end of the week”.

He rejected suggestions he was trying to provide cover for Saudi Arabia: “No, not at all, I just want to find out what’s happening.”

Over the past few days, Mr Trump has raised the possibility of “rogue killers” being behind the journalist’s disappearance. And he has cautioned against rushing to blame Saudi leaders, telling the Associated Press news agency that they were being treated as “guilty until proven innocent”.

What is reported to be on the recording?

Early on in their inquiry, Turkish investigators said they had evidence that Mr Khashoggi – a critic of Saudi leaders – was murdered.

Reports in Turkish media give gruesome details of what are said to be his final minutes.

A Turkish newspaper says the consul himself, Mohammed al-Otaibi, can be heard in the audio recording of Mr Khashoggi’s death.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The search of Saudi consular buildings continues

Yeni Safak, which is close to the government, quotes him as telling alleged Saudi agents sent to Istanbul: “Do this outside. You’re going to get me in trouble.”

Mr Otaibi flew back to Riyadh on Tuesday.

How is Turkey’s investigation progressing?

On Wednesday and into Thursday, investigators spent almost nine hours searching the Saudi consul’s residence, then moving on to the consulate itself about 200m (650ft) away, according to Reuters news agency.

The team included prosecutors and forensics experts in white overalls.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption Police inside the Saudi consul’s residence

Several vehicles with Saudi diplomatic number plates were filmed by CCTV cameras moving from the consulate to the residence just less than two hours after Mr Khashoggi entered the consulate on the day he vanished.

The consulate building was searched for the first time on Monday.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

On Tuesday, Mr Pompeo was in Riyadh for talks with Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who he said “strongly denied” any involvement in the journalist’s disappearance.

The events of 2 October

Mr Khashoggi is a US resident and columnist for the Washington Post newspaper who went into self-imposed exile last year after reportedly being warned by Saudi officials to stop criticising the crown prince’s policies.

He arrived at the consulate at 13:14 local time for an appointment to obtain paperwork so he could marry his Turkish fiancée.

Saudi officials have insisted Mr Khashoggi left the consulate soon afterwards and came to no harm.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionCCTV footage shows missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

But Turkish officials believe an assault and struggle took place in the building.

They allege that Mr Khashoggi was killed by a team of Saudi agents who were pictured entering and leaving Turkey on CCTV footage released to media outlets.

The New York Times reports that four of the 15 agents have links to Crown Prince Mohammed, while another is a senior figure in the country’s interior ministry.

On Tuesday, G7 foreign ministers called for Saudi Arabia to conduct a “transparent” investigation into the issue.

Meanwhile, International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde has become the latest high-profile figure to withdraw from a major Saudi investment conference next week following Mr Khashoggi’s disappearance.

source

Maintained Matthew Leffler

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